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New Nationals Baseball Cap Design Was an Epic Fail

A hot dog, a bald eagle, and an overall mess of a hat was quickly cut within 24 hours of going live.


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On Tuesday, New Era released its fresh baseball caps as part of its new “Local Market” series aimed at hometown fans. The idea was to represent each team’s respective city with various logos and symbols. You might be thinking: Here comes an eye roll-worthy Nationals cap covered in predictably boring monuments. Not at all! Too basic. No, these hats were designed with DC in mind, of course. That explains the bald eagle, the out-of-context hot dog (is that supposed to be Ben’s?), and the special “1776” badge that obviously nods to the important time when…DC didn’t yet exist.

At least one date makes sense: 1901, the year the Washington Senators played their first season. (To be charitable, the flat brim could be viewed as a reference to early Nats closer Chad Cordero.) It wasn’t just the Nats hats, either—other designs were dragged on Twitter for looking as if they were constructed with the help of clip art. NBC Sports Washington reported that within 24 hours the hats were pulled from New Era’s website. Too bad we couldn’t preserve one! It’s local history, after all.

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Web Producer/Writer

Rosa joined Washingtonian in 2016 after graduating from Mount Holyoke College. She covers arts and culture for the magazine. She’s written about anti-racism efforts at Woolly Mammoth Theatre, dinosaurs in the revamped fossil hall at the Smithsonian’s Natural History Museum, and the horrors of taking a digital detox. When she can, she performs with her family’s Puerto Rican folkloric music ensemble based in Jersey City. She lives in Adams Morgan.